Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/ecoevolu/public_html/blog/wp-content/plugins/subscribe-news-letter/subscribers.php on line 73

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/ecoevolu/public_html/blog/wp-content/plugins/subscribe-news-letter/subscribers.php on line 73
Eco Evolution BlogEco Evolution Blog

ESB to introduce a new greener ‘time of use’ tariff scheme

The ESB are expected to introduce a new ‘time of use’ tariff scheme within the next two years. Householders will be encouraged to use power at non-peak times to ease pressure on the national electricity grid.

pylons

The utility said “It will be part of a smart metering programme and residential customers can expect to see it in 2018 or 2019.”  The idea is to encourage people to use less energy and greener energy and flex demand so as to be easiest on the system.

It is not known whether the move will mean more expensive power at certain times of the day – it may simply mean cheaper energy during the night. Company trials have found that when people knew there were cheaper tariff periods, they saved 4pc to 5pc on their bills.

Charging Point

It was also announced that ESB would finally begin requiring payment for eCar charging points around the country. Earlier this year, the utility postponed seeking €17 per month for usage of the almost 1,000 charging points nationwide. The utility are now communicating with eCar customers about the imminent introduction of charges and are currently looking at appropriate tariffs.

The utility said “Ultimately, everything has to be paid for. We need to reinvest and keep the system up to date. We will have to charge

Irish company prepares to test wave energy device in Galway Bay

Irish company, Sea Power, is preparing to test their prototype wave energy device at the Galway Bay Marine and Renewable Energy Test Site in the coming weeks. Following successful completion of testing at small scale, the company, which received grant support from the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI), is now progressing to quarter scale testing in open sea conditions for the first time.

sea-power

The Sea Power device has been in development for eight years and will soon make the short journey from Foynes in Limerick, where it was built, to the Galway Bay test site. Wave energy devices, such as Sea Power, will ultimately harness the extraordinary power of the waves off Ireland’s coast, to generate electricity.

SEAI and the Marine Institute are working together to develop Ireland’s ocean energy testing infrastructure which includes tank testing facilities at Lir National Ocean Test Facility in Cork, the consented quarter scale test site in Galway Bay and the planned full scale Atlantic Marine Energy Test Site off the Mayo coast.

The site at Galway Bay is Ireland’s consented site for testing wave energy converters at quarter scale and has been operating for the last ten years.

“It’s very encouraging to see innovative Irish technologies progress through the country’s testing facilities. Ocean energy is an emerging sector for Ireland, offering huge potential in job creation and energy security. With some of the most energy rich ocean resources in the world, located off our West coast, Ireland has the potential to become a market leader in this sector.  Developing our sustainable energy resources allows us to move away from our reliance on imported fossil fuels, which cost our economy billions of euro a year,” said SEAI chief executive Jim Gannon.

Ireland already boasts other successes in ocean energy technologies with Irish companies such as Ocean Energy having progressed to developing a full scale prototype of their OE Buoy device following successful testing in Galway Bay.

OpenHydro, based in Greenore, Co. Louth recently deployed two 2MW tidal turbines in Northern France.  Since 2009, SEAI has supported over 80 early stage ocean energy projects through its prototype development fund to the value of €13 million.

You can see the evolution of the device; from tank testing, through small scale testing, to construction of the ¼ scale device in Foynes dockyard, and deployment in Foynes dock in the video below.

Sea Power will work with SmartBay Ireland – a not-for-profit company that manages the national marine test facility in Galway Bay – in bring the device to its next stage of development.

SmartBay Ireland was established to support the management of the national marine test facility in Galway Bay and to promote and develop opportunities for the test site so that researchers and industry can utilise this unique marine facility. The site provides users with a pathway towards commercialisation by providing the opportunity to test devices and sensors in a real-marine world environment.

The Sea Power device has successfully completed a third-party design verification process. Device testing and all associated activities will be conducted in compliance with SmartBay Ireland’s ISO accredited health and safety, environmental and quality systems.

The installation of the moorings is expected to commence on or after October 12 with the quarter scale device being deployed the following week, weather permitting. The device measures 16.8m long x 4.5m wide. On the basis of the trial continuing successfully, the device will undergo performance testing at the site until March 2017.

For full press release see SEAI

Hydropower at Ardtornish Estate in the Scottish Highlands

Ardtornish Estate is a Highland estate in Scotland located in Morvern, Lochaber.  The present owner of the estate is passionate about conservation; and with the estate team has spent the last few years creating a hydro-power systems high in the hills to provide low-carbon, renewable energy.

unnamed (1)

With conservation and sustainability at the heart of the estate’s objectives, three hydro power schemes are currently in place, another is under construction, and a fifth , an Archimedean Screw hydropower turbine is due to be commissioned in July 2016. A biomass woodchip boiler heats the mansion house, and green initiatives are being developed to reduce further the estate’s carbon footprint.

Hydropower at Ardtornish Estate in the Scottish Highlands

The delivery of the Archimedean Screw hydropower turbine required delivery along some single track roads through stunning mountain scenery. This installation will provide a unique visitor attraction as well as supplying power to the estate businesses and holiday cottages.

Artornish8

Rated at 100kW this semi compact Archimedes Screw hydropower turbine at Ardtronish Estate will save 86 tonnes of CO2 annually. Mann Power Consulting Ltd., the UK based Archimedean Screw specialists designed the equipment for this project.  After various consultations it was decided that the most suitable turbine for the site was a semi compact Archimedes Screw Hydro turbine which was manufactured by Landustrie based in Holland.

Ardtornish 7

Artornish5

The Archimedes Screw hydropower turbine is a new application of an ancient technology. For thousands of years the screw was used to pump water up from rivers or streams to irrigate farm land. Now, using the same system in reverse the Archimedean Screw is being used to harness the power of the water to generate hydroelectricity. Once your turbine has been commissioned and connected to the grid you’ll be generating hydro-electric power 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whether the power is for your own property, to sell back to the grid or a combination of both, the Archimedean Screw will likely pay for itself several times over in the course of its operational lifetime (depending on the feed-in tariffs available) . And what’s more these turbines can be scaled to suit all needs – from small domestic applications to huge industrial installations.

Ardtornish11

unnamed

unnamed (2)

The basic requirements required for an Archimedes Screw hydro turbine are:

  • A water source with a drop of at least 1.5 metres
  • Access rights to that water source
  • A grid hook-up point less than 500 metres from the water source – unless the Screw is being used for ‘off grid’ generation only.

If your site satisfies these criteria then there’s every chance you will be able to harness the power of the waterway to generate hydroelectricity. And Eco Evolution will be delighted to pilot your scheme all the way through to delivery.

If you’re still not sure whether your site is right for an Archimedean Screw turbine, get in touch and we will be happy to discuss the specifications and requirements in greater depth.

Community Hydropower at Ludford Mill

Ludford Mill hydropower scheme is a community investment project which will supply hydropower for local households with excess power supplied to the grid. The Ludlow Hydro Co-operative made the decision to harness the river Teme for Ludlow by bringing the 17th Century listed Ludford Mill back to life by installing  a state-of-the art Archimedean Screw hydropower turbine, cunningly designed to fit in with the current buildings. Installed at a 17th Century listed mill and horseshoe weir on the Teme the semi compact Archimedean Screw hydropower turbine with a maximun power output of 29kW and an estimated annual output of 170,000kWh will save 73 tonnes of CO2 annually.

Artists impression of Ludford Mill hydropower scheme

Artists impression of Ludford Mill hydropower scheme

The Archimedean Screw is contained inside an enclosure which is built to complement the structure of the existing buildings, and the screw itself will not be visible. The enclosure will also provide sound insulation so that noise levels will be kept very low.

249

The scheme was designed by Mannpower Consulting Ltd and the civil engineering work began on the hydro turbine in the second week in August 2015 and the schedule was that by the second week in October the main enclosure walls would be complete, with stop logs top and bottom, which would allow the removal of the temporary cofferdam and retreat out of the river itself.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

225

Over the next few months between October and January preparations were put in place to build the pump house for the electrical control gear, sluice gates, screens and walkways were installed and electrical cables and hydraulic lines were in place for the arrival of the turbine.

Ludford Mill

257

Then 30kW Archimedean Screw hydropower turbine designed by Landustrie arrived on site in March and was commissioned by Mannpower and Eco Evolution in April.

258

Once again we see the Ancient power of Archimedes being used for hydropower generation because if it’s fish-friendly credentials. The Archimedean Screw turbine provides a fish-friendly alternative to conventional turbines, ideally suited to low-head (1m-10m) sites, and sites with fish protection issues. Extensive fish passage tests have conclusively demonstrated that the large water chambers and slow rotation of the Archimedean Screw allow fish of all sizes, and debris, safe passage through the turbine. As a result, the Environment Agency has agreed that no screening is required.

If you are the owner of an old mill site or a potential hydro site or are a community group interested in developing a hydro project for community use please contact us here.

 

 

Global Wind Day 2016 – Ireland

Global Wind Day 2016 is being celebrated through the month of June here in Ireland. Irish wind farm events are running in partnership with events taking place, across Europe and around the globe. Global Wind Day is coordinated by Wind Europe and the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) to raise awareness of the positive benefits of our clean, safe and renewable wind energy.

This year in Ireland we’re celebrating through the month of June with wind farms across Ireland hosting an array of events to celebrate wind energy with family open day visits and tours, 5k and 10k runs on wind farms, educational events, business events and more. The activity dates vary and some are hosting public wind farm open-days so that families can learn about wind energy and see the turbines in operation themselves, whilst others are inviting schools for fun, games and facts on wind.

ballycadden

It is also a day for discovery of the work that has already begun by pioneers around the world. In more than 75 countries around the world, wind farms are in operation, generating energy from a clean and renewable source.

Some events need pre-registration and booking so please check out the listing below.

Come and help celebrate Irish renewable wind energy around Global Wind Day 2016, find the nearest event to you at the listing below, and keep checking in as new events are added:

Global Wind Day Events around Ireland 2016. Photo Credit: IWEA

How it all began:

The Wind Day was first held in 2007, as the European Wind Day organised by the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). The main idea was to connect a network of partners as well as using centralised communication tools, press releases and distribution of gadgets and coordinate of event organised by national wind energy associations and companies active in the wind energy field. The Wind Day in 2007 reached 18 countries, with a participation of around 35,000 people. By 2008, the event’s reach extended to 20 European countries and attracted 100,000 people.

In 2009, EWEA joined forces with the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) and extended the reach from European associations and companies to coordinate Wind Day events across the globe. That year, the 300 events in 35 countries across the globe reached up to 1,000,000 people.

In 2010 and 2011 between 220 and 230 events took place in around 30 countries. Since 2009, Global Wind Day has reached more than 1,000,000 people plus the thousands of people engaging and supporting the event through online means such as social media.

Last year was a great success in Ireland with over 1000 people visiting wind farms across the country. This year sees a number of wind farms across Ireland hosting an array of events to celebrate wind energy. The activity dates vary and some are hosting family days whilst others are inviting schools for fun, games and facts on wind.

Events organised around Ireland to celebrate Global Wind DayIrish Wind Energy Association (IWEA)