Climate Change Conference

Eco Evolution were invited to the climate change conference by the Wexford County Development Board.

The speakers on the day were from the EPA, Wexford County Council, NUI Maynooth, Teagasc and Courtown Waterworld.

Wexford County Development Board, (CDB), wanted to highlight and discuss the implications of climate change. The CDB launched its strategy “Action for change 2009-2012” last year. Action 7 calls for a  local multi-agency response to climate change. The aim of the conference was to raise local awareness and consider how Wexford can adapt to the likely impacts.

In time, the impacts of climate change will be more apparent in Wexford. There continues to be debate but predicted effects include:

  • More intense storm and rainfall events
  • Water shortages in the Summer and the need to irrigate crops
  • Effects on fish species that are sensitive to small temperature changes
  • Accelerated coastal errosion

The purpose of this conference was to localise the issue, to highlight the effects of climate change for our economy and public services and our citizens and their environment. The conference illustrated the impact of climate change at County level and also the possible adjustments that may be needed to manage longer term change.

For full details of the Conference speakers presentations follow the link below:

http://www.wexfordcdb.ie/cdb/ClimateChangeConference/#d.en.14835

 

 

 

No further carbon credits needed by Ireland

EPA Press Release: 28th April 2010.

  • Latest greenhouse gas emissions projections show Ireland will comply with Kyoto Protocol without any more purchases
  • Achieving more stringent 2020 targets will require further reduction measures yet to be identified
  • Growth in transport emissions projected to slow significantly to 2020 compared with annual growth rates 1990-2008
  • Carbon sinks (such as increased afforestation) crucial for 2020 target

The EPA today released projected emissions of Ireland’s greenhouse gases up to 2020. These projections, produced on an annual basis, give a picture of Ireland’s ability to meet international targets with respect to greenhouse gas emissions and update those published in March 2009.

The projections are reported on a sectoral basis and highlight, once again, that the key sectors contributing to greenhouse gas emissions in Ireland are agriculture, energy and transport.

Commenting on the projections Dr Mary Kelly, Director General, EPA said:

“National greenhouse gas projections are important in understanding Ireland’s greenhouse gas profile in the medium term, and in assessing the effectiveness of policy measures designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.  The projections released today reflect the effects of the economic downturn, and the anticipated recovery, based on ESRI economic forecasts. Even with reductions due to the downturn it is projected that Ireland will still be 2.8 million tonnes per annum of CO2e above the non-ETS target in 2020 taking the most ambitious scenarios set out in Government policies and assuming that forestry sinks are fully included.”

Complete EPA Report: http://www.epa.ie/news/pr/2010/name,28091,en.html

Carbon tax to drive up fuel costs

irishtimes.com – Last Updated: Wednesday, December 9, 2009, 18:59

Carbon tax to drive up fuel costs

HARRY MCGEE, Political Correspondent

The new carbon tax at a rate of €15 per tonne will result in increases of 4.2 cent in the price of petrol and almost 5c in the price of diesel from midnight tonight.

The Minister for Finance Brian Lenihan announced the measure in today’s Budget speech, saying it was designed to change behaviour to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“The most effective way to to put a price on carbon. This will encourage innovation by incentivising companies to bring low carbon products and services to the market,” he said.

The measure will yield a total of €250 million next year and some €330 million in a full year.

Notably, the Minister said that not all of the revenue would be ringfenced to encourage lower carbon emissions. He said some would be used to boost energy efficiency, some to support rural transport and some to alleviate fuel poverty.

He added that the tax “will also allow us to maintain or reduce payroll costs”, an indication that it will not be revenue neutral.

Some €50 million of the revenue will be used to fund measures for households at risk of fuel poverty to make their homes warmer.

The excise changes for oil, gas and kerosene will come into effect from tonight but price increases in coal, peat will not occur until May 2010.

The changes will lead to increase of an estimated 39 cent for a bale of peat briquettes and €1.79 for a 40kg bag of coal.

The latest study from the ESRI estimates the changes will cost households an average of between €2 and €3 per week, or up to €156 per year.