The Benefits of an Archimedean Screw Hydropower Turbine

Energy generated from flowing water resources gives the highest efficiency rating of all sustainable energy sources!

The Archimedean Screw hydropower turbine is a new application of an ancient technology. For thousands of years the screw was used to pump water up from rivers or streams to irrigate farm land. Now, using the same system in reverse the Archimedean Screw is being used to harness the power of the water to generate hydroelectricity. Hydropower installations generate renewable energy from flowing water resources. This could be from a lake, river, stream or from old mill sites.

Archimedean Screw turbines offer a hydropower solution that is:

  • Commercially attractive & cost effective
  • Practical & efficient
  • Fish-friendly
  • Easy implementation in existing situations (no civil constuction work)
  • Insensitive to clogging
  • Low maintenance costs
  • Improvement of water quality
  • Self regulating to changing water flow
  • Long life time
  • Scaleable & bespoke

This technology lets you harness the power of the water that flows over or through your land. Once your turbine has been commissioned and connected to the grid you’ll be generating hydro-electric power 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whether the power is for your own property, to sell back to the grid or a combination of both, the Archimedean Screw will likely pay for itself several times over in the course of its operational lifetime (depending on the feed-in tariffs available) . And what’s more these turbines can be scaled to suit all needs – from small domestic applications to huge industrial installations.

Overview of an Archimedean Screw ~ Photo Credit: Landustrie

Overview of an Archimedean Screw ~ Photo Credit: Landustrie

If you’re not sure whether your site is suitable for an Archimedean Screw we’ve put together a checklist of requirements for your reference. Archimedean Screw turbines offer a uniquely flexible hydropower solution that can be installed at sites with a broad range of topographical features. But there are some fundamental requirements your land will need if a project can go ahead.

The basic requirements required for an Archimedean Screw hydro turbine are:

  • A water source with a drop of at least 1.5 metres
  • Access rights to that water source
  • A grid hook-up point less than 500 metres from the water source – unless the Screw is being used for ‘off grid’ generation only.

If your site satisfies these criteria then there’s every chance you will be able to harness the power of the waterway to generate hydroelectricity. And Eco Evolution will be delighted to pilot your scheme all the way through to delivery.

If you’re still not sure whether your site is right for an Archimedean Screw turbine, get in touch and we will be happy to discuss the specifications and requirements in greater depth.

 

Mills & Millers of Ireland Summer Event –Saturday 4th July 2015

The Society of Mills and Millers of Ireland was launched in 2001 to encourage and assist in the preservation and appreciation of mills as part of our industrial, architectural and landscape heritage. There are hundreds of mills and mill sites spread across the country and while many are beautifully refurbished or put to good use, there are also many others which could be restored or renovated while preserving their traditional context. The society aims to promote interest and awareness in this aspect of Ireland’s industrial heritage by building up knowledge and expertise in areas such as law, architecture, renewable energy and manufacturing and making information available through publications, lectures and events.

Old Mill Coffee Shop, Upperlands

Old Mill Coffee Shop, Upperlands

The Old Mill Coffee Shop is based in the heart of the Historic Linen Village of Upperlands and opened in March 2013 it is a restored beetling mill bursting with character. The beetling mill is situated beside the coffee shop, this is said to be the only commercial beetling mill in the world!

Beetling Mills Coffee Shop

This year’s Summer event is a one day event taking place on the 04th July in the lovely countryside of County Derry. It’s going to be a very active day with visits to several local mills, a tour of the Beetling Mill in Upperlands and a talk by Mr. Douglas Lamont followed by a visit to the Clark family. After lunch the group will visit Barney and Michael Lagan, Upperlands. Take a look at the timetable to see the list of interesting events that have been organised.

Mills & Millers of Ireland Summer event 2015

Mills & Millers of Ireland Summer event 2015

Fee for the day including refreshments and lunch: €25 per person.

To book:
(A) Download a booking form here and return to: Hon. Treasurer Mr. John Delaney, Ballingard Road, Roscommon, County Roscommon (Cheques payable to MMOI)

or
(B) Pay for the event using the PayPal secure online payment option button. Please select the number of places from the drop down menu.

Telephone enquiries: S. Bourke

Mills and Millers of Ireland Spring Event 2015 – Mills of East Waterford

The Society of Mills and Millers of Ireland was launched in 2001 to encourage and assist in the preservation and appreciation of mills as part of our industrial, architectural and landscape heritage. There are hundreds of mills and mill sites spread across the country and while many are beautifully refurbished or put to good use, there are also many others which could be restored or renovated while preserving their traditional context. The society aims to promote interest and awareness in this aspect of Ireland’s industrial heritage by building up knowledge and expertise in areas such as law, architecture, renewable energy and manufacturing and making information available through publications, lectures and events.

Mills and Millers of Ireland Spring Event 2015

Ballindud Mill Photo Credit: Ballindud Mill and Cottage

This year’s Spring event is a one day event taking place on the 18th April in the lovely countryside of County Waterford. It’s going to be a very active day with visits to several local mills, Ballindud Mill, Jim Butler’s Mill, Tom Butler’s Gorteens Mill, Strangsmills and a talk by historian John Walsh on local East Waterford Mills. . Take a look at the timetable to see the list of interesting events that have been organised.

MMOI spring event 2015

Fee for the day including refreshments and lunch: €25 per person.

To book:
(A) Download a booking form here and return to: Hon. Treasurer Mr. John Delaney, Ballingard Road, Roscommon, County Roscommon (Cheques payable to MMOI)

or
(B) Pay for the event using the PayPal secure online payment option button. Please select the number of places from the drop down menu.

 

Boland’s Mill on the Kings River, Kilkenny (1193 – 1990)

The five storey Boland’s Mill  is situated in one of the most attractive mill environments in Ireland, beside the beautiful Kings River in Kilkenny.

g

The 5 storey Boland’s Mill

The origins of Boland’s Mill traces back to 1193, when it was owned by Augustinian monks from Cornwall. It remained the property of the Augustinians until 1540; Cromwell had ownership at one time and gave it to a man named Holohan.  By the middle of the 18th century ownership had passed to people called Phelan who milled for many years.  In 1825 Richard Hutchinson bought it and left it to his nephew, also called Richard Hutchinson, who ran the mill from 1912 to 1939 when he became ill.

w

The waterwheel

Lily Hutchinson, his daughter, took over the running of the mill when her father died in 1940 and ran it successfully through the difficult war years. She married Arthur Boland in 1954 and he ran the mill until his untimely death in 1979, aged 58.  The mill was idle in the years from 1979 to 1983 when Oliver Mosse leased the building and produced Kells Wholemeal between 1983 and 1987. Bill Mosse took over the running of the mill between 1987 and 1990 when it ceased milling and has been idle since.

j

One of 5 original mill stones

Boland’s Mill is one of seven mills situated along the Kings River between Kells and Thomastown. Some are still standing and others are now in ruins. Although the mill has fallen into disrepair over the years the original  gearing that was made from timber, the five mill stones, a large selection of the tools used during the milling of the grain and the original weigh bridge are all still intact.

g

Original Wooden cogs

Boland's Mill on the Kings River, Kilkenny

Boland's Mill on the Kings River, Kilkenny

Original weigh bridge

The Mill worked on commission.  The farmer owned the corn which was ground at a price per Bushel.  In those days a farmer aimed to grow enough wheat to supply his family with the wholemeal for the year and enough Barley and oats to feed his cattle, horses, sheep and hens – also for the year ahead. It was an excellent system, giving security to the farmer and his household.  During the war farmers were allowed to keep 1 Bushel of wheat per member of his household per year so they were never short of wheatmeal to make bread.

g

Harvest time was very busy in the mill.  All the wheat had to be dried before it was milled and if the harvest was wet most of the barley and oats also needed drying.  The grain was hauled up to be dried either in the drying lofts or in the kiln room. The grain was fed to the stones through the shoots sunk in the upper floors of the mill.  Each grain demanded a different stone dressing and for fine ground grain riddling and screening was also necessary.

If you are the owner of an old mill site or a potential hydro site or are a community group interested in developing a hydro project for community use please contact us.