Farmers show interest in Micro-hydro power.

In a suitable location small-scale hydropower is one of the most cost-effective and reliable of the renewable energy technologies.   It has several advantages over wind and solar power, with a high level of predictability, varying with annual rainfall patterns. It is a long-lasting and robust technology and systems can readily be engineered to last for 50 years or more.

Those attending were given an understanding of the principles of micro-hydro, connecting to the Grid and the economics of potential systems. Eoin was then able to demonstrate the plant on Ballynalough Farm.

Renewable Energy Event at CAFRE’s Enniskillen Campus on 22 February 2012:

Organising committee. From left: Gareth Gormley, DARD, Connor Maguire, CAFRE, Lindsay Easson, AFBI, Kieran Coulter, DARD, Eric Long and David Trimble, CAFRE.

For those  interested in energy from micro-hydro and other renewable technologies, DARD, in conjunction with the Ulster Farmers’ Union  and Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute are running another Practical On-farm Renewable Energy Event, this time at CAFRE’s Enniskillen Campus on Wednesday 22 February from 1.30pm through to 10.00pm.

The Fair is open FREE of charge to anyone in the farming and rural sector who are interested in reducing their costs through adopting more energy efficient practices and will provide a platform to network, source, meet suppliers and keep up-to-date on energy-saving systems and renewable technologies.

There will again be a series of seminars throughout the day on each of the main renewable energy technologies; wind power, biomass production and utilisation, anaerobic digestion, solar hot water, micro-hydro, and heat pumps.

A second series of seminars will deal with many of the issues facing those considering a green energy source. Topics covered will include the proposed Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI), grid connection, planning, NI Renewable Obligation Certificates (NIROC’s), business planning, taxation, as well as finance and funding options.

In addition there will be a Trade Exhibition and the opportunity to see the biomass boiler installation at Enniskillen campus. For further details contact Connor Maguire at 028 6634 4853 or connor.maguire@dardni.gov.uk

Hydro projects in Northern Ireland: 

The first ever Archimedean Screw generator in Northern Ireland was only recently installed at Shane’s Castle in Antrim. Rated at 214 kilowatts this is the largest single Archimedean Screw generator ever manufactured. It is now fully commissioned  fully operational.

The predicted annual output is a massive 1,125,000 kilowatt-hours. To put this in perspective, an average household uses less than 5,000 kilowatt-hours per year, so this hydro scheme has the potential to power more than 225 houses. This scheme will also save an impressive 484 tonnes or more of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions by generating clean, green electricity.

Shane’s Castle Hydro Project, Antrim

Omagh District Council  are  utilising the weir on the Camowen River, adjacent to Omagh Leisure Complex, to generate electricity through an Archimedean Screw hydro turbine. This hydro project is the second of only two Archimedean Screw hydro projects to date in Northern Ireland. The development of the hydro scheme on the Camowen River will generate sufficient power to meet the needs of Omagh Leisure Complex with excess electricity sold back to the national grid. Rated at 121 kilowatts the hydro turbine is predicted to save in excess of 133 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) annually. It is expected that this project will be fully commissioned and operational in the coming weeks.

Omagh Hydro Project, Tyrone

We look forward to meeting you at the show.

We offer a friendly one-stop shop for hydro development, from feasibility studies to licensing, to installation and commissioning and everything in between.

 

 

Shane’s Castle Green Generation

Shane’s Castle on the shores of Lough Neagh near Randalstown in Co. Antrim is the family seat of the O’Neills of Clandeboy. The Demesne is one of the most beautiful and well maintained in Ireland with a rich variety of flora and fauna, including a lovely herd of fallow deer that have been resident there for many years. The Castle is in ruins due to a devastating fire in 1816 but the remaining structure, including a unique Camellia House designed by John Nash, is still a prominent feature in the landscape. A recent and fitting addition to the Demesne is an Archimedean Screw hydro turbine, ancient technology but with a 21st century application.

The O’Neill family are well known for their preservation and conservation and love of nature and the environment and this Archimedean Screw hydro project complements their environmental initiatives very well indeed. Rated at 214 kilowatts the hydro turbine is predicted to save an impressive 840 tonnes or more of Carbon Dioxide (CO2emissions annually by generating clean, green electricity and will make a major contribution to the Demesne’s green philosophy.

This project is a reinstatement of an old hydro system that was installed circa 1900 that was used to power the estate before mains electricity was introduced to Shane’s Castle in the 1950’s. The old system was capable of generating a maximum of about 55 kW so the new Archimedean Screw system, with its high efficiency across a wide range of flows, is capable of producing at least five times the amount of energy over the year.

The predicted annual output is a massive 1,300,000 kilowatt-hours. To put this in perspective, an average household uses less than 5,000 kilowatt-hours per year, so this hydro scheme has the potential to power more than 260 houses in the locality.

The arrival!

Arriving on site

Almost 15m long the screw weighs approximately 35 tonnes

Offloading from the lorry

With a diameter of 3.5m this screw can take a flow rate of up to 5.5m3/s

The Archimedean Screw turbine provides a fish-friendly alternative to conventional turbines, ideally suited to low-head (1m-15m) sites, and sites with fish protection issues. Extensive fish passage tests have conclusively demonstrated that the large water chambers and slow rotation of the Archimedean Screw allow fish of all sizes, and debris, safe passage through the turbine.

As a result, the Environment Agency (UK) has agreed that no screening is required.Literally thousands of fish passages have been monitored and recorded using underwater cameras at the intake, inside the chamber of the Screw itself and at the outflow to assess the effect of the Screw on salmonids (including smolts and kelts), brown trout and eels.

The trials looked at fish passage across a broad spectrum of sizes and turbine speeds, possibly the most impressive of which was the safe passage of a kelt measuring 98cm in length and weighing 7.6kg. In addition, behavioural and migrational patterns across the species have been shown to be entirely unaffected by the turbine.

Screw is installed at an angle of 26deg. in this channel

Moving into position

In situ

A lifetime of clean, green generation ahead

 

Fish pass installed along side the Screw

 

Completed project

 

The scheme was designed by Hydroplan and the Archimedean Screw equipment was supplied by Mann Power Consulting based in Yorkshire. Mann Power are the pioneers of the Archimedean Screw in the UK and Ireland and Eco Evolution based in Co. Wexford are their authorised representative for the whole of Ireland. This Hydro project at Shane’s Castle is the first of its kind in Northern Ireland and rated at 214 kilowatts this is the largest single Archimedean Screw generator ever manufactured. Eco Evolution and Mann Power installed the massive machine at Shane’s Castle earlier this year. The scheme was commissioned during the summer and it is now fully operational.

 

Shane’s Castle Worksheet

 

 

 

 

 

More Rural Development Funding On Offer

A NEW round of funding for rural development projects has opened in County Down.

Farmweek Edition – 20th October 2011

A NEW round of funding for rural development projects has opened in County Down.

In the latest call for applications for monies to help improve the quality of life in rural communities, the Down Rural Area Partnership (DRAP) is inviting local people across the Ards, North Down, Banbridge and Down areas to submit project proposals under the ‘village renewal and development’ theme.

The theme aims to support the development of village plans or fund the updating of existing plans, or to support the physical and environmental regeneration improvements in both large and small villages.

Nearly £4m has already been committed to over 80 projects across the four council areas since the rural development programme began in 2009, with grants ranging from a few hundred pounds to several hundred thousand, all with the aim of improving the quality of life in rural communities.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for progressive groups in our towns and villages to access funding for new ideas to improve and up-grade the environment of these areas. I would hope that all of the eligible towns and villages will take this opportunity with open arms and help make the places where we live better for everyone, resident and visitor alike,” said Councillor Jim Fletcher, Chair of the Partnership.

To apply for rural development funding you must live in a rural location in one of the four Council areas – rural is defined as a settlement with a population of 4,500 or less – or if you live in an urban setting, you must be able to demonstrate that your project will principally benefit a rural area. Farmers, private businesses and social economy enterprises, as well as individuals over the age of 18, can all take advantage of these funding opportunities.

The Rural Development Programme 2007-2013 is part financed by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

Applications can be made online through the EU Grants website www.eugrants.org or hard copy application forms can be obtained by contacting the Down Rural Area Partnership office on 028 9182 0748. Guidance notes to include eligibility criteria and funding thresholds for the above measure are available at  www.downruralareapartnership.com. The closing date for applications is Wednesday 7th December 2011 at 4.00pm.

Source: Farmweek

 

 

Romney Weir is turning the screw on CO2

Romney weir is turning the screw on CO2. Two Archimedean Screw hydro turbines, rated at 150kW each and designed by Mann Power Consulting Ltd., are to be installed on the weir to generate clean, green electricity that will be used locally.  With a total capacity of 300kW this will be one of the largest Archimedean Screw hydro schemes installed to date in the UK and Ireland. The largest single screw was recently installed at Shane’s Castle in Northern Ireland, rated at 214kW it is the largest ever manufactured Archimedean Screw hydro generator and was designed and supplied by Mann Power .

Romney Weir ‘A’ is in Windsor. The weir was built in the 1790’s and is used to control water levels between Old Windsor lock and Boveney lock. The Romney Weir hydro scheme will utilise just two of the ten existing weir bays and have little effect on current weir operations. Weirs were originally built to control water levels for navigation and flood risk purposes but can now take advantage of new technology to provide energy.

Romney Weir

To help ensure the £1.7million project both generates clean energy and improves the local environment the old Denil type fish pass will be replaced with a Larinier style fish pass which will enable over 12 species of fish including trout and perch, as well as endangered eels, to migrate up this stretch of river,  some for the first time in over 200 years.

The scheme will be fitted with a number of environmental protection measures including rubber bumpers on the turbine blades to minimise risk to fish.

A  four metre flood gate will also be linked to the scheme and will open automatically when river levels are high to ensure there is no increased risk from flooding

Pile driving completed at Romney Weir

The project, which was granted planning permission in August 2008, will consist of two four meter diameter Archimedes screw type turbines occupying two bays in the Romney Weir and will generate 300 kilowatts per hour at peak times, enough to power  600 households. It is estimated the turbines will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 790,000 kilos per year. This clean, green electricity will be used to power Windsor Castle.

The two 150kW turbines at the Landustrie factory

Mann Power Consulting Ltd., the UK based Archimedean Screw specialists designed the equipment for the Romney Weir project.  After various consultations it was decided that the most suitable turbine for the site was an Archimedean Screw Hydro Turbine which was manufactured by Landustrie based in Holland. The Landy screws are four meters in diameter, 6 meters long and each has the capacity of 150 kW. A unique feature of each screw is the number of blades or helices; here being 5 instead of usually 2 or 3. This is the first five bladed Archimedes Screw Hydro Turbine to be installed in the world to date.

Dave Mann visiting Landustrie in Holland

 

The turbines on route to Romney

The two 150kW Archimedean Screw turbines arrived on site in the early hours of Wednesday morning 7th September 2011.

The two turbines in the compound awaiting installation

 

Turbine floating to the weir on a pontoon

Installing the Archimedean Screws

The two Archimedean Screws installed on Romney Weir

The golden brown colour of the turbines and their housings were chosen by the residents of Eton, who look out onto the weir.

The turbines in-situ at Romney Weir

Sluice gates and Larinier Fish Pass

Four Hydraulic Rams have been installed to automatically move and adjust the two 94 tonne turbines as the river level changes.

Hydraulic ram being craned into place

 

The two hydraulic rams in-situ

 

Commissioning of the scheme is expected to take place in the coming weeks.

 

The fish-friendly Archimedean Screw hydro turbine.

 The Archimedean Screw turbine provides a fish-friendly alternative to conventional turbines, ideally suited to low-head (1m-10m) sites, and sites with fish protection issues. Extensive fish passage tests have conclusively demonstrated that the large water chambers and slow rotation of the Archimedean Screw allow fish of all sizes, and debris, safe passage through the turbine. As a result, the Environment Agency has agreed that no screening is required. Literally thousands of fish passages have been monitored and recorded using underwater cameras at the intake, inside the chamber of the Screw itself and at the outflow to assess the effect of the Screw on salmonids (including smolts and kelts), brown trout and eels. The trials looked at fish passage across a broad spectrum of sizes and turbine speeds, possibly the most impressive of which was the safe passage of a kelt measuring 98cm in length and weighing 7.6kg. In addition, behavioural and migrational patterns across the species have been shown to be entirely unaffected by the turbine.

Dave Mann commissioned the fish passage studies instrumental in persuading the Environment Agency to accept the technology. Mann Power have a proven track record of successful installation throughout the UK and Ireland. One of the first challenges presented to Mann Power when Dave Mann set up the consultancy firm in 2003 was to find a hydropower solution for a community project in North Yorkshire, situated in a low head site within a Site of Special Scientific Interest with particular stipulations for the protection of an endangered fish species. The result of extensive research into possible solutions culminated in the introduction of the Archimedean Screw turbine – already widely used in continental Europe – for the first time into the UK, and Mann Power have been at the forefront of supplying this equipment for hydro generation projects since 2004. Mann Power now supplies this equipment throughout the UK and Ireland, as well as providing expert consultancy services.

Dave Mann, a member of the British Hydropower Association Council, has been instrumental in the design, installation and commissioning of all but a few of all Archimedean screw power generation sites in the UK and Ireland to date with over twenty schemes fully operational and a further forty or so at various stages of development. Mann Power have commissioned several independent studies to verify the Archimedean Screw’s fish-friendly credentials and also its efficiency. Mann Power is established within the national hydropower industry as a leader in the field of designing bespoke hydro-generation installations, specialising in low head and ‘difficult’ sites which previously may have been considered unsuitable for such applications.

Eco Evolution work in colaboration with Mann Power Consulting on hydro sites throughout the island of Ireland and the UK.

We also design modern water wheels for electricity generation.

 

All photographs copyright of Mann Power Consulting and Eco Evolution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fish-friendly Hydro for Omagh – Part I

Omagh District Council has recently commenced work on a hydro project utilising the weir on the Camowen River, adjacent to Omagh Leisure Complex, to generate electricity through an Archimedean Screw hydro turbine. The hydro scheme uses the same intake point that was used to feed the headrace to Scott’s Mills that started operations about 1850 in the town.The development of the hydro scheme on the Camowen River will generate sufficient power to meet the needs of Omagh Leisure Complex with excess electricity sold back to the national grid.

Rated at 121 kilowatts the hydro turbine is predicted to save in excess of 133 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) annually and will make a major contribution to the Council’s green philosophy. This project will complement the Council’s initiatives to develop ‘green’ energy from renewable sources, including the installation of a biomass boiler at Omagh Leisure Complex. The revenue generated by the electricity from the hydro scheme will be contributed to a sustainability fund, which would become a resource to support other sustainability projects in the district.

Omagh Leisure Complex is amongst the most modern leisure facilities having almost doubled in size from its opening in 1982 with further expansion planned. Set in 26 acres of landscaped grounds the complex caters for everyone from the casual swimmer to the serious athlete.

This project to develop a hydro turbine on the Camowen River will create a very valuable resource for renewable energy, with many benefits being re-invested to the community and providing a valuable educational resource for Omagh. Not only will the provision of this renewable energy help protect the environment, but it will also contribute to achieving the Council’s target for energy consumption from renewable sources.

Site on the Camowen river prior to works commencing
Bank cleared in readiness for construction of the hydro scheme

With flood protection in place ground works begin

The Council is very conscious of the importance of the Camowen River as a fishery, and of the concerns of anglers. After various consultations it was decided that the most suitable turbine for the site was an Archimedean Screw.
The Archimedean Screw turbine provides a fish-friendly alternative to conventional turbines, ideally suited to low-head (1m-10m) sites, and sites with fish protection issues. Extensive fish passage tests have conclusively demonstrated that the large water chambers and slow rotation of the Archimedean Screw allow fish of all sizes, and debris, safe passage through the turbine. As a result, the Environment Agency has agreed that no screening is required.
Literally thousands of fish passages have been monitored and recorded using underwater cameras at the intake, inside the chamber of the Screw itself and at the outflow to assess the effect of the Screw on salmonids (including smolts and kelts), brown trout and eels. The trials looked at fish passage across a broad spectrum of sizes and turbine speeds, possibly the most impressive of which was the safe passage of a kelt measuring 98cm in length and weighing 7.6kg. In addition, behavioural and migrational patterns across the species have been shown to be entirely unaffected by the turbine.

Pile driving and deep excavation for the intake channel

Foundations laid

Reinforced concrete works at power house location

Pre-cast culvert units aligned to form part of the intake channel
Sluice gate installed
The power house and intake channel have now been constructed.

Construction of the Intake Channel

Intake channel leading to the power house

 

Power house and sluice gate

Larinier fish pass to improve fish passage at site

Dual flight Larinier Fish Pass with resting pool installed alongside screw location

This Hydro project is the second of only two Archimedean Screw Hydro projects to date in Northern Ireland. Mann Power Consulting and Eco Evolution are installing both turbines. Mann Power Consulting based in Yorkshire are the pioneers of the Archimedean Screw in the UK and Ireland and Eco Evolution based in Co. Wexford are their authorised representative for the whole of Ireland.

Mann Power Consulting and Eco Evolution are the Archimedean Screw generating specialists in the UK and Ireland. Mann Power Managing Director, Dave Mann, brought the Archimedean screw as a generating turbine into the UK for the first time in 2004. Dave commissioned the fish passage studies instrumental in persuading the Environment Agency to accept the technology. Mann Power have a proven track record of successful installation throughout the UK and Ireland and their services are split into five distinct stages allowing clients complete flexibility to decide their own project timescale. They offer a fully integrated 3-D design and build capability and they are the sole distributors of Rehart Archimedean screws in the UK and Ireland.

The first ever Archimedean Screw generator in Northern Ireland was only recently installed at Shane’s Castle in Antrim. Rated at 214 kilowatts this is the largest single Archimedean Screw generator ever manufactured. Eco Evolution and Mann Power recently installed the massive Rehart manufactured machine at Shane’s Castle. It is expected that the scheme will be commissioned shortly and it will then be fully operational.

The predicted annual output is a massive 1,125,000 kilowatt-hours. To put this in perspective, an average household uses less than 5,000 kilowatt-hours per year, so this hydro scheme has the potential to power more than 225 houses. This scheme will also save an impressive 484 tonnes or more of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions by generating clean, green electricity.

Eco Evolution are also currently working on a smaller 20 kilowatt private scheme in Co. Antrim that is at the early stages of development. This scheme will provide power to a farm with excess electricity sold back to the national grid.

Incentive payments in way of Northern Ireland Renewable Obligation Certificates (NIROCs) are available for renewable generators including hydro. NIROCs are available for the electricity generated by the hydro turbine, this electricity can then be used on site with the excess exported to the national grid. There is an Export Tariff available for any excess electricity that is exported to the national grid.

The Eco Evolution professional team offers a friendly one-stop shop for hydro development, from feasibility studies to licensing, to installation and commissioning and everything in between.

Eco Evolution are also currently seeking suitable investment sites for hydro development around the country. Leases on suitable sites with potential in excess of 50 kilowatts would be considered.

All photographs copyright of Eco Evolution.

Fish-friendly Hydro for Omagh – Part II

The installation of the Archimedean Screw.