Micro-generation export and Refit tariff updates

Micro-generation covers small scale generators where customers can generate their own electricity and export the surplus back to the grid. Microgeneration technologies include small scale wind turbines, hydro turbines and solar photovoltaic systems.

Evance R9000 5kW Wind Turbine

Electric Ireland have extended their micro-generation payment of (9 cent / kWh) by a further year to 31st December 2012. This will be the second successive year that the expiry date has been extended and it reinforces Electric Ireland’s commitment to its support of customers who install a domestic micro-generator.

ESB Networks continue to offer a support package up until 29th February 2012, comprising of a free installation of import / export meter and payment of a support payment of (10 cent / kWh) which applies to the first 3,000kWh exported annually. This payment will last for a period of 5 years and will end on the 5th anniversary of the contract start date.

The ESBN micro-generation payment (10 cent / kWh) and the free installation of import/export meters will not be extended beyond 29th February 2012.  Import/export meters will now be charged at approx €350.00.

Solar pv slates

Budget 2012 and VAT refund for Farmers

The 2012 Budget included an extension of the existing VAT Refund Order for flat-rate farmers to include a refund on the purchase of wind turbines.

The existing VAT refund order, which provides for the refund of VAT paid by un-registered farmers on the construction of farm buildings, fencing, drainage and reclamation of farm land, has been amended to provide that such farmers may claim a refund on wind turbines supplied and installed after  1st January 2012.

Archimedean Screw Hydro Turbine ~ Shane’s Castle

REFIT – Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariff

REFIT stands for ‘Renewable Energy Feed in Tariff’ and is the primary means through which electricity from renewable sources is supported in Ireland.

The REFIT II scheme (onshore wind, small hydro and landfill gas) is open as and from 23rd March 2012 and the REFIT III (biomass technologies) scheme opened in February  2012. Both schemes are for projects built and operational between 1/1/10 and  31/12/15.

 

Terms and conditions for REFIT II (Onshore wind, hydro and biomass landfill gas) can be found here

The REFIT II scheme is intended to cover small and large scale onshore wind, biomass landfill gas and small hydro (?5MW.) To be eligible for REFIT II, the various requirements that will be set out in the terms and conditions must be fulfilled including proof of planning permission and grid connection -plants must be new plants neither built nor under construction on 1/1/2010.

 

Terms and conditions for  REFIT III (Biomass Technologies) can be found here

REFIT III is a scheme to cover 310MW of certain biomass related REFIT categories as follows:

> 50MW of AD sub technologies (AD CHP ?500 kW ; AD CHP >500 kW; AD (non CHP) ?500kW ; AD (non CHP) >500kW);

> 100MW of Biomass CHP (non AD) sub technologies (biomass CHP ?1500kW; Biomass CHP >1500kW);

> 160MW of biomass combustion and co-firing.

NOTE:

The REFIT II and REFIT III competitions are separate schemes with separate terms and conditons in respect of each scheme.

New clarifications may issue in due course on the new Terms and Conditions, if deemed necessary.

 

Small wind turbines ride out last week’s Atlantic storms

Last week’s violent Atlantic storm brought extremely high winds to the West and North of Scotland, with the Met Office recording maximum wind gusts of 165mph on Cairngorm Summit and 145mph at Aonach Mor.* The Met Office issued its strongest warning – a red alert – for winds in Scotland, and people were warned to stay indoors, schools were forced to close and flights were cancelled.

For owners of Evance R9000 small wind turbines, however, Scotland’s extreme wind speeds didn’t present any challenges. The Evance R9000 turbine is designed to keep running in the highest winds, and features an innovative Reactive Pitch™ mechanism that automatically pitches the turbine’s blades so it can regulate energy capture and blade speed.

Evance has over 50 of its R9000 turbines installed in the Orkney Islands. All continued to perform well during the storm, confirming the applicability of small wind turbines even in these most extreme conditions.

Evance R900 5kW Wind Turbine

One Evance turbine owner, Adam Cockram, lives on Eday – one of Orkney’s Northern Isles – where peak gusts of over 130mph (58 metres per second) were recorded. According to Adam: “on Thursday night and Friday morning last week the wind gusted at up to 138mph. I did wonder whether our Evance turbine would keep going, and I’m glad to say that there were no problems at all!”

“Like many in Orkney we experienced several mains power failures. Each time the turbine started back up with no problems at all,” continued Adam. “I’m certainly impressed by the quality of both the Evance turbine and the installation carried out by Orkney Micro Renewables. It’s certainly been tested here on Eday!”

Adam Cockram’s Evance R9000 turbine was commissioned in August 2011, and in five months has already produced 7,343kWh of electricity.

 

The Evance R9000 installed on a farm near Ferns, Co. Wexford.

 

Note

*http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/news/releases/archive/2011/research-flight