ESB to introduce a new greener ‘time of use’ tariff scheme

The ESB are expected to introduce a new ‘time of use’ tariff scheme within the next two years. Householders will be encouraged to use power at non-peak times to ease pressure on the national electricity grid.

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The utility said “It will be part of a smart metering programme and residential customers can expect to see it in 2018 or 2019.”  The idea is to encourage people to use less energy and greener energy and flex demand so as to be easiest on the system.

It is not known whether the move will mean more expensive power at certain times of the day – it may simply mean cheaper energy during the night. Company trials have found that when people knew there were cheaper tariff periods, they saved 4pc to 5pc on their bills.

Charging Point

It was also announced that ESB would finally begin requiring payment for eCar charging points around the country. Earlier this year, the utility postponed seeking €17 per month for usage of the almost 1,000 charging points nationwide. The utility are now communicating with eCar customers about the imminent introduction of charges and are currently looking at appropriate tariffs.

The utility said “Ultimately, everything has to be paid for. We need to reinvest and keep the system up to date. We will have to charge

Renewable Energy Support Scheme – Public Consultation 2015

Update! The department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources have extended the public consultation until 18 September 2015.

 

Two public consultation documents, published by Minister for Energy Alex White on Friday 31st July 2015 seek views on the renewable energy technologies that currently receive financial support from the State, and whether the Government should broaden the range of technologies it supports. One consultation focuses on renewable electricity technologies, while the other focusses on renewable heat systems.
The future of energy is in your hands!

The future of energy is in your hands!

The consultation on renewable electricity supports says that, while wind energy will continue to make an important contribution to meeting Ireland’s renewable energy targets, it should be complemented by other technologies to meet the country’s renewable energy ambitions. It says these could include bioenergy, solar, offshore wind, wave and tidal technologies if they are both technically feasible and cost effective, and says the consultation will help determine whether supports are necessary to develop these technologies.
The consultation will also explore the potential and value of providing supports to micro-generation and smaller community-based projects.
The Renewable Heat Incentive consultation document proposes a renewable heat incentive (RHI) to encourage larger industrial and commercial heat users to switch to systems that produce heat from renewable sources, including biomass. It will inform an assessment of the feasibility of various technologies deployed to produce heat from renewables and tariffs “at a level that represents the most cost effective transition to the levels of renewable heat required.”
The consultations will help determine the criteria for financial support schemes to replace existing programmes, including the REFIT schemes, which expire at the end of this year. They both emphasise the importance of citizen and stakeholder engagement in the development of renewable energy policy and infrastructure.
Renewable Energy Support Scheme - Public Consultation 2015

Renewable Energy Support Scheme – Public Consultation 2015

 Minister White said: “Encouraging the use of renewable electricity and heat sources will help us meet ambitious targets to reduce carbon emissions and tackle global warming. The energy White Paper, which I will publish in October, will set us on a path to transform Ireland’s energy production and consumption patterns so that, by 2050, our system will be largely decarbonised. One objective is to develop and broaden the range of renewable energy technologies at our disposal, which will also drive innovation and create green jobs.
“Our energy transition must respect citizens, who recognise the need to stop global warming, but who may also be concerned about the impact of energy technology and infrastructure on their communities. These consultations give everyone the opportunity to express their views on the renewable electricity and heat technologies that Government could support, before any decisions are made.”
The 2009 EU Renewable Energy Directive set Ireland a legally binding target of meeting 16% of its energy requirements from renewable sources by 2020. Ireland is committed to meeting 40% of electricity demand from renewable sources, as well as 12% of heat demand and 10% of transport fuel. Last October, the European Council reached political agreement on a target of a 40% reduction in European greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. The agreement committed the EU as a whole to increase the proportion of energy it gets from renewable sources to 27%.
The consultation will remain open until 17:30 Friday 11th September.
Submissions may be made in writing to ress@dcenr.gov.ie
Alternatively submissions may be made in writing to:
Decarbonisation Division
Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources,
29-31 Adelaide Road,
Dublin 2
D02 X285
For more information see: bit.ly/1Tpu0mY