Global Wind Day 2013 – Ireland

Global wind day

Global wind day

Global Wind Day is a worldwide event that occurs annually on 15 June. It is a day for discovering wind, its power and the possibilities it holds to change our world. This year it is being marked in Ireland through a series of events across the country including ‘Walk and Talk’ open days at numerous wind farms across Ireland.

It is also a day for discovery of the work that has already begun by pioneers around the world. In more than 75 countries around the world, wind farms are in operation, generating energy from a clean and renewable source.

Thousands of individuals are involved in the production of energy from the wind, but for many people, wind energy is a mystery. Global Wind Day is the day when you can visit wind farms, meet experts, attend events and find out everything you want to know about wind energy.

The European Wind Energy Association (EWEA ) and the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC ) coordinate the Global Wind Day through a network of partners. The day started as a European one in 2007 and went Global in 2009. On 15 June, thousands of public events are organised all over the world.

IWEA Global Wind Day 2013 Winner: Paul Whelan highlights the need to create a sustainable future in order to protect the wellbeing of future generations. Location: Tournafulla wind farm, Co.Limerick

IWEA Global Wind Day 2013 Photography Competition Winner: Paul Whelan Location: Tournafulla wind farm, Co.Limerick

How it all began:

The Wind Day was first held in 2007, as the European Wind Day organised by the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). The main idea was to connect a network of partners as well as using centralised communication tools, press releases and distribution of gadgets and coordinate of event organised by national wind energy associations and companies active in the wind energy field. The Wind Day in 2007 reached 18 countries, with a participation of around 35,000 people. By 2008, the event’s reach extended to 20 European countries and attracted 100,000 people.

In 2009, EWEA joined forces with the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) and extended the reach from European associations and companies to coordinate Wind Day events across the globe. That year, the 300 events in 35 countries across the globe reached up to 1,000,000 people.

In 2010 and 2011 between 220 and 230 events took place in around 30 countries. Since 2009, Global Wind Day has reached more than 1,000,000 people plus the thousands of people engaging and supporting the event through online means such as social media.

Last year was a great success in Ireland  with over 1000 people visiting wind farms across the country. This year sees a number of wind farms across Ireland hosting an array of events to celebrate wind energy. The activity dates vary and some are hosting family days whilst others are inviting schools for fun, games and facts on wind.

IWEA Global Wind Day Photo Competition Runner Up: Keith Arkins highlights how wind turbines can become immersed in their environment and often complement their surroundings. Location: Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry.

IWEA Global Wind Day Photo Competition Runner Up: Keith Arkins Location: Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry.

Global Wind Day sends the message across the world that wind energy is a key solution to the looming energy crisis – our over dependency on imported and finite fossil fuels – and the climate change crisis, and that it is already working. It helps people realise that wind energy is a popular and mainstream power technology.

IWEA Global Wind Day 2013 Photography Competition 2013  Runner Up: Philomena Kenealy's entry, taken by photographer Ross Harding captures the economic and societal benefits wind energy delivers for Ireland’s next generation with her picture of Engineer JulieBrett sitting upright atop a wind turbine with a 44 metre hub height in Raheem Barr Windfarm, Castlebar Co. Mayo

IWEA Global Wind Day 2013 Photography Competition Runner Up: Philomena Kenealy’s entry, taken by photographer Ross Harding. Location: Raheem Barr Windfarm, Castlebar Co. Mayo

IWEA Photography Competition Winners:  Global Wind Day photo competition  – highlighting the benefits of harnessing wind power to replace unsustainable fossil fuels.

Events organised around Ireland to celebrate Global Wind DayIrish Wind Energy Association (IWEA)

Take Action for Renewables – Tell world leaders to switch to renewable energy

 

 

Green Technology Powers Iconic Historic Inn

Three Evance R9000 5kW wind turbines and a substantial battery backup system have been installed at the 500-year-old Kirkstone Pass Inn in the Lake District National Park by microgeneration experts Evance. The Inn is believed to be linked to an ancient 15th Century monastery, records for this building date back to 1496AD.

The Kirkstone Pass Inn. Photo by David Hall.

The Inn being off-Grid was in its ancient past candle lit with open fires. It had relied in modern times entirely on expensive  diesel generators for all electrical power resulting in diesel bills last year totalling some £25,000. With the Evance small wind turbines the owner can now take advantage of the Inn’s remote location at the picturesque summit of the Cumbrian Kirkstone Pass and harness the power of the wind.

Looking back to the Kirkstone Pass Inn. Photo by David Hall.

Owner John Jennings said “We simply had to look at alternative power sources or face inevitable closure. Although we are in a remote location, we wanted a solution appropriate for use within a National Park and one that would let us generate electricity in a more environmentally-friendly way. Using the energy generated by Evance’s turbines we are committed to cutting our diesel bills by at least 75%. I’ve been pleasantly surprised that the majority of visitors haven’t even noticed the turbines until they have been pointed out! New green technology powering an iconic historic inn is proving to be an interesting talking point at the bar.

Three Evance R9000 5kW windturbines installed at Kirkstone Pass Inn

Diesel generators produce a lot of carbon waste, as well as being noisy, so generating power using the turbines will dramatically reduce the use of diesel. The turbines alone will reduce the Inns’ CO2 emissions by over 22 tonnes per  year supporting a low-carbon Lake District.

Kevin Parslow, CEO of Evance Wind Turbines said “We’re delighted that the Inn, like so many other remote rural businesses and homes chose the R9000 small wind turbines to deliver a clear financial and environmental improvement on their existing energy generating systems. It’s good to know that this historic inn will be there for visitors in the years to come.”

The Kirkstone Pass Inn for the first time in it’s 500+ year  history has Power Without Pollution!

Note: Eco Evolution are resellers and installers of the Evance 5kW R9000 windturbine in Ireland.

Wind Power To Reduce Energy Bills And Carbon Footprint ~ The Evance R9000

Evance R9000 5kW Wind Turbine

Evance R9000 5kW Wind Turbine

Renewable energy is key to our low-carbon energy future, as well as diversifying energy sources. Today wind power continues to gain ground as a profitable and effective energy source.

Evance Wind Turbines have been manufacturing and supplying small wind turbines for over 10 years. The R9000 5kW wind turbine has been engineered to ensure maximum energy yield by generating energy at low wind speeds, and by running continuously and safely at high wind speeds – the most efficient 5KW turbine available.

Using the latest advances in aerodynamics and electronics, their engineers set out to bring you one of the most advanced small wind turbines on the market with unsurpassed efficiency, reliability and safety.

Testing and qualifying the product in the most extreme of conditions meant that the Evance R9000 was the first wind turbine under 10kW to be fully certified under the UK Government Industry Standard, Microgeneration Certification Scheme.  This accreditation is a formal recognition of the durability, reliability, safety and overall performance of the R9000, which provides customers with confidence in the turbine.

Evance R9000 installed in Dublin

The Evance R9000 Advanced Wind Turbine is the result of 10 years of dedicated research and development, and is based on the experience of designing utility scale turbines. Specifically designed to work with the wind to capture more energy at lower wind speeds, the R9000 is the most efficient 5kW turbine available, producing more energy a year than other 5kW, 6kW and even 10kW turbines. Combining patented state of the art technology and elegant design, the R9000 belongs to the ‘next generation’ of small wind turbines, offering class leading quality, performance and reliability.

The R9000 starts generating energy at low wind speeds and is designed to run continuously at high wind speeds, so providing the maximum yield possible – giving you energy generation when the wind is blowing it’s strongest.

At low to moderate wind speeds the patented pitch system, Reactive Pitch™, holds the blades in the optimum position for capturing maximum energy from the wind. At high wind speeds the R9000’s Reactive Pitch™ mechanism automatically pitches the blades so it can regulate energy capture and blade speed. It therefore continues to capture energy – up to the full 5kW power rating.

The R9000 is manufactured in the UK at new purpose-built facilities near Loughborough. Using automotive experience, each one is assembled under strict quality control. Every R9000 undergoes final testing to ensure that it complies with Evance exacting standards.

The R9000 wind turbine delivers class leading energy yields allowing households and businesses to reduce electricity bills substantially, and in some cases generate an income.

By capturing power at low and high wind speeds the R9000 can generate 9,167kW with Annual Mean Wind Speed (AMWS) of 5m/s  (11.2mph).

Average Power vs Wind Speed

Annual Energy Yield vs Annual Mean Wind Speed

Export Tariff Update:

Electric Ireland have extended their micro-generation payment of (9 cent / kWh) by a further year to 31st December 2012. This will be the second successive year that the expiry date has been extended and it reinforces Electric Ireland’s commitment to its support of customers who install a domestic micro-generator.

ESB Networks continue to offer a support package up until 29th February 2012, comprising of a free installation of import / export meter and payment of a support payment of (10 cent / kWh) which applies to the first 3,000kWh exported annually. This payment will last for a period of 5 years and will end on the 5th anniversary of the contract start date.

The ESBN micro-generation payment (10 cent / kWh) and the free installation of import/export meters will not be extended beyond 29th February 2012.  Import/export meters will now be charged at approx €350.00.

The average electricity consumption in Ireland is 5,000kWh per household per year. The R9000 can generate 13,653kWh, based on an annual mean wind speed of 6m/s, more than enough electricity to run two households.  There are also planning exemptions for small-scale wind turbines in Ireland.

Evance R9000

The R9000 requires minimal maintenance

Both the wind turbine and the tower are designed to provide outstanding durability – a minimum design life of 20 years. With few mechanical parts, in particular no gearbox, the R9000’s maintenance is minimal.

The Evance 5kW Wind Turbine installed on a farm in Boolavogue, Co. Wexford: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rH5hfrw1lbI

For further information read the Evance R9000 brochure.

Click here  for more information on Micro-generation export and refit tariff updates.